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the economy grow more and more jobs be created because we have had the slowest recovery during this recession since any time after the world war ii, at least. very, very slow. but we have done something to a degree we have never done before, and that is borrow and spend to stimulate the economy. and someone has compared borrowing and spending to stimulate the economy to the idea of someone taking a bucket, scooping up water in one end of the swimming pool and pouring it into the other. you have got no net gain. the truth is you lose some of the water out of the bucket as you walk along the shore. in this case what we lose is, we lose interest on that debt indefinitely because there's no plan to pay down the debt. so this budget that's before us today does not balance, it does not put us on a sound path, it does not create confidence in the -- among the american citizens that the future is going to be sound, that we've gotten this country reoriented in a way that's going to produce long-term growth. indeed, it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's goin
that shifts the fundamentals of our economy. the industrial revolution and introduction of the changes in society are powered by the exponential technology that changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant feedback account millennials are the forefront of that. how we move forward in this fast-paced world the millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we go out and also it's brought us a sense of easing adaptability. it's brought us to be resilient in the economic crisis that has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year it can be totally different because we saw how quickly it started and how quickly it might go away. there's a sense of optimism and social mindedness which i think came out of line 11 which is in the minds of a lot of this generation seeing our country in that momen
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
company with extraordinarily small economy. the fact it would precipitate a run with the greek banks or italian banks and bring down the entire system in europe, fumbling along, kicking the can down the road is really pretty fried and we know from experience these events, whether in the balkins with the shooting of an arch duke or whether in cyprus with the shooting of a banking system can lead to fairly significant consequences for the entire european continent and us. >> so far, the worst-case scenario hasn't happened yet. so far. that's good. let me ask you, steve forbes. do you believe that the united states can make itself immune? are we strong enough economically, and financially, to withstand the kind of worst-case scenario that senator gregg discussed? >> the answer is no. we should have learned that from 2008 when these dominos start to topple. it hits everybody. and this is what is so inexplicable. why did the germans draw the line on this, for sheer domestic political reasons. they don't want to be bailing out russian oil gargs. they have an election this year. they have k
companies are doing well and the economy is starting to look up, but there's no denying this it rally is in large part fuelled by the fed, which has kept interest rates so low you can't make money anywhere other than the housing and stock markets. the stock market is lot more liquid than housing. to help prop up the down economy, the fed has been pumping money into the system every month in exchange for bonds. that increases the money supply. it drives down interest rates. for awhile now, the fed funds rate, which is the benchmark for loans americans use to raise money, has been at near zero. the hope is that banks and other lenders will use this cash to lend to consumers and businesses. borrowers will take advantage of the lower interest rates to buy homes and perch cars and start new businesses and get the economy churning again. it's been working. home prices are rising again due to low mortgage rates. more americans are finding jobs again. but fed says it won't stop printing money until the unemployment rate dips below 6.5%, which means the fed's probably going to be at it until 2
. >>> not even a down economy can crush rock and roll. legendary kiss rockers gene simmons and paul stanley kick off a big expan shun of their restaurants. they're here in first on fox interview to tell us why now is the time to bet on the consumer. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's turn to today's market moment. fears over cyprus's bailout led to a choppy day of trading on wall street. the dow managed to eke out a slight gain with the nasdaq and s&p 500 posting minor laws. the s&p fell for the third straight session. that is the worst losing streak of the year. microsoft could be in some hot water with the justice department. microsoft and some of its business partners are being investigated over a foreign bribery claims. government officials in china, italy and romania were allegedly bribed to earn software contracts but shares of microsoft still managed to close the day up slightly. >>> all right we start tonight in cyprus. the parliament rejected the tax on bank deposits, potentially killing the bailout but russia is floating another option, gazprom, w
%, which meant it was getting broad support from all sectors of the economy. i did make a mistake, which was turning it over to iraqi politicians. i should have turned it over to judges, people who did not have a political ax to grind. on the army, there was no question it was the right thing to do not to recall the army. we should have not said it was disbanding it. the pentagon said it would be self-demobilized. it would have been a big mistake to have called the army back. it would have led to the break up iraq. the kurds were very clear they would secede. when we did try to bring back a single battalion in april 2004, it went immediately over to the insurgency and started shooting at americans. it did not work. building the army from the bottom up -- a new army from the bottom up -- was the right path. today, the iraqi army is the most respected institution in the country. >> when you look back your tenure in baghdad, it was a difficult time. are you proud of what you did? >> i am satisfied. proud is probably going to far. i think that the 3000 civilians who work in the cpa from 25 d
and teach you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. i got two of them here. you've got the good economy. tremendous housing numbers, miraculous retail sales, terrific oil and gas markets. you have the bad economy. weakening commodity prices. slow commercial real estate business. really bad world commerce outlook. real soft information technology sales. you mix them all up together and you get the absolute perfect environment for the fed reserve to stay stock market friendly. that's exactly what happened today. ben bernanke allowed the averages to power higher. dow gained 56 points. the s&p rising today, nasdaq jumping .78%. it's not sleight of hand or alchemy at work here, despite what critics say when they constantly slam the fed. >> boo! >> bernanke is not playing a game of move the stock market higher by simply continuing to keep the competition from bonds incredibly weak. he's got a real good reason for doing what he's doing, which is staying the course, keeping rates low. that reason? 1937. see, ben bernanke is a rigorous guy. he's a professor and a genuine scholar of american financial histor
brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. susie, once again, little cyprus making big economic noise today. >> you're right, tyler. actually a big win for citizens in cyprus. lawmakers rejected today an unpopular and unprecedented proposal to tax bank deposits. it was part of a larger eurozone bailout plan to rescue those banks and keep the nation solvent. the crucial vote came after a wave of protests, and as cypr t cypriots scrambled to withdraw cash from their atms. bertha coombs joins us with more on today's historic vote and what's ahead for cyprus? >> what's ahead is a very big question. the world was watching the tiny island nation again today, in a show of hands-on opposition, party members voted no on a tax and 10% of bank deposits, a condition set by eurozone officials to secure 10 billion euro bailout. many called it extortion. ruling party members abstained saying beyond saying no they need to find another plan.
correction? with the rising economy and profits this rally still has legs. also in year three of obama care premiums and insurance costs are rising sky-high. so are taxes. and small business costs are reducing profits by as much as 65% according to one small business owner we will talk to tonight. and the virtues of a free market capitalism that we talk about every night on this show are now forbidden fruit at stanford university. a popular long running pro capitalist course at that school has now been cancelled. what is up with that? "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, a major vote in the cyprus parliament helping to get that country closer to a teal with the european union. michelle caruso-cabrera joins us from cyprus again this evening with the very latest. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: larry, lawmakers here in cyprus taking a huge step tonight to prevent the financial collapse of their country. they pass ad law that will allow for the restructuring of their banks. this essentially means their sickest and largest banks will be down sized and made more healthy. this
economy. its banks are not highly connected with the rest of the international financial system. there is no risk of contagion here. >> adam, actually, of all the ideas you laid out, which do you think is the least bad of all those solutions? is it going ahead and letting the banks fail? >> that would be my preferred route. failure implies that the banks can't pay their depositors. they are restructuring. they will be very orderly. basically, the banks would be closed for two days. what would come out is when they reopen, the depositors would be the large depositors because the small depositors would be fully protected. the large depositors would be the owners of a bank and they would have deposits of somewhere between 50 1k3 60 or 70% of their money and the rest of the shares in the new bank. the banks would be solvent. the banks could be highly capitalized and they would then have access to the ecb for refinancing to provide any liquidity. >> and the fallout from that would be that the russians -- >> and basically -- >> the fallout for that is that the russians are the ones wh
on the economy, the market, and the fed next. ♪ ♪ lou: ben bernanke's federal reserve keeping money cheap, plentiful. chief economist for ubs will tell us whether this is sufficient magic for the market through the remainder of the year. let's take a look at what happened on wall street. today's talks are moving higher. investors expecting just the news that they received, the fed's standing fast, holding steady, helping -- keeping 85 billion a month into the markets in perpetuity. the dow up 56 points, but within 20 points of its all-time high setting a new intra-day record. the s&p up ten points coming within seven of its record high, the nasdaq up 25 them. the nasdaq still some 1800 points away from its all-time high close. over 3 billion shares traded on the big board. gold down $3.80 today, we'll update, interest rates moving slightly higher on the bond market's the treasury ten year holding up till 194. fed chairman ben bernanke warning monetary policy, as he put it, cannot offset fiscal restraint resulting from the fiscal cliff and sequestered. my next guest says economic damage fr
those economies dramatically, weakens those countries. and it also weakens italy. >> you're saying potential contagion. finally, how does it get resolved? michelle is talking about a good bank/bad bank, nobody pays on deposits up to $100,000. the bailout is 10 billion euros from the european -- ecb. the bail-in is about $6 billion euros. so greece is looking for whatever they're looking for, $4 billion, $5 billion. or does europe bail that out even more? >> the biggest factor of all, dan and i were talking a couple minutes ago, the depositors above 100,000 will lose 40% to 50%. >> those are russians. they're going to be pissed off. >> the great systemic problem of giant bank failures is somewhat eliminated by what they're putting forward now. >> what do you think, dan? does this work? >> for our viewers i don't think it matters. the specifics are super interesting, we're going to go have a drink. what matters to people at home, what matters to the larger story is we decided that people's property in banks was not their own. >> in europe or in the u.s., too? >> in europe only. >> th
to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a
bernanke will keep printing to bail out barack obama's weak economy. and print as many yen as it takes to bail out japan. the markets truly love it. europe is the odd man out. they've given ultimatum to cyprus, no bailout if you can't get it together by next tuesday. here is something else to get you fired up. cyprus wants to nationallize y payshun money. "varney & company" is about to begin. [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futureses move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. all on thinkorswim. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >> thursday, march 21st. m headline today, ben bernanke
affect the u.s. economy. presumably including cyprus. as well as the improving u.s. job market, and strong housing sector. and as we wait for fed officials to wrap up their meeting tomorrow, it's expected they will leave interest rates unchanged. joining us to talk more about the fed, randall krosner, former fed governor and now professor of economics at the university of chicago. i've not had the benefit of being in those meetings. you have, and i'm curious to know, do you think cyprus came up? if so, how? and how would the fed governors and members of the fomc handicap its possible effects on the u.s. economy? >> it certainly would have come up, i think, if some analogies with iceland from a number of years ago. even a smaller country, only 250,000 people, not a million people, but it was something that we focused on. we worried about and tried to think of what the implications are. here it's clear the europeans have made i think a terrible mistake in making this proposal. that potentially could undermine confidence, and that could have knock-on effects not only for the whole
jobs and grow the economy. democrats disagree. they think you do not send enough money to washington. their budget increases taxes by $1.5 trillion on top of the hundreds of billions they have already added to your tax bills at the beginning of the year. they also have no plans to say the entitlement programs even though the president knows doing is not about the costs an option. doing nothing makes no sense. budgets are about setting priorities. republicans realize we have a moral obligation to spend your hard earned tax dollars wisely. we should but only what we need to cover the functions of government and not a dollar more. that is why we support reforms to fix the programs washington should be funding and a limited programs it shouldn't and balance a budget. federali note that the government wastes hundreds of dollars each year. we need to identify and remove wasteful areas of the budget. instead the president has decided to cut on order security, first responders, and law enforcement. the director of u.s. immigration and customs recently testified before a house subcommittee th
the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. neil: government officials say they want to clean up the tax code. to make a very serious point, the government is looking at a uniform internet tax. when we were told would never happen. on top of the other taxes that we were told would never happen. this federal internet tax, i am telling you, get ready for it. it i coming soon. charles payne and melissa francis they do not expect it to stay at the levels for long. it is here, the question is whether europe starts low and high. >> you are right, it opens the gate to that. but it makes you very nervous. one of the things about buying online is that a lot of the ti
part of the economy that's being left at a tivitate now, and where's the exit strategy? >> and i think revenue could be an issue. oracle is out with its third quarter. revenue came at 8.6 billion versus 9.3 billion, an estimate. jon fortt has all the numbers right now. >> let's drill down to some numbers, maria. exactly where oracle missed, because this is a miss. on new license and cloud revenue, the street was looking for 2.57 billion. they came in at $2.3. on hardware product revenue, the street wanted somewhere around $800 million in research. they came in at $671 million. that's well below their guided range on that. and on non-gap operating margin, they came in at 47%, which is right about where the street was looking. they don't give guidance until the call, but this is really important, because they're guiding into their biggest quarter, their fiscal q4. also, larry ellison has said the hardware business was going to have a transition quarter in q3. we should expect to start seeing it growing in q4, given this hardware number, it's going to be especially important for them to b
[inaudible] >> in the supermarket, there's evidence of a cash economy expanding. >> we have suppliers demanding cash. not all of them but some are in a panic situation and are demanding cash payments. >> so everyone is waiting to see whether the government can strike a deal with the e.u. by the deadline of monday and save the country from bankruptcy. the challenge for cyprus and its parliament is how to raise nearly $6 billion and so qualify for a full zureo -- eurozone bailout. the problem is there is tension between cyprus and germany. only today angela merkel was warning that patience has its limits. banking would be restructured with smaller bank accounts protected but larger accounts possibly taking steep losses and there might still be a tax on savings. it was rejected once but might be applied to big deposits. every move is controversial. these bank statue were blocking the roads today. they fear restructuring the banks will lead to layoffs. >> they fear they won't have a job. what do you think will happen? >> whatever is decided here will still have to win the approval of the
these kind of revolution that shifts fundamentals of our economy. you look at the industry evolution, the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by exponential technology, which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things, to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant -- in a constant feedback loop. the ability to trade stocks in nanoseconds. so, millenials are at the forefront of that. we understand that as reality. so, other generations are running around saying, how do we adapt? good forward any fast-paced world. the millenials are taking it all in stride because that's the reality of how we agree up, and also brought the sense of ease and adaptability and the ability to be resilient, the economic crisis, which, wow, has led to incredible youth unemployment, and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see in one year it could be totally different. we saw how quickly it
to give the state all of our resources which would be at least 3 billion euros to help the economy. maybe a little bit of help from heaven. back over to you. >> the archbishop, this is something people should go look up this piece of the story. this is a fascinating piece. he's seen as this spiritual leader there who has been quite vocal. he's been out there talking saying let's get out of the euro and go back to the pound. do we have carolyn? can i briefly ask what it's like on the ground there? we understand that it may be several more days, not just thursday, before people can access their money in cyprus. >> absolutely. initially we know that banks were going to be closed up until tomorrow but at this point there's a lot of speculation that banks will be closed up until tuesday because monday is another bank holiday and at this point it's very, very uncertain that we'll get a viable plan b to get the bailout deal in place at this point it doesn't look like we'll get it by tomorrow. at this point we are expecting that banks are going to be closed for a little bit longer. of course that
schoolers? the right answer later in the grapevine. up next, the state of the u.s. economy. what are the chances of another recession here? for over 75 years people have saved money with...ohhh... ...with geico... ohhh...sorry! director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable laughter). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico. saving people money for over seventy-five years. gecko: don't look at me. don't look at me. by the armful? by the barrelful? e carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> bret: no major changes on the horizon in how the federal reserve is dealing with the economy. while fed chief bernanke says things are getting better not eve
to share with you some views of the economy from our 54 respo respondents. firming housing prices are a game changer. there is something much more self-feeding about recovery this year. could be a turning point. the objepposite from john rober. we believe a recession/economic slowdown is a possibility in the latter half of 2014 or early in 2015. some of the excesses that could cause a recession are beginning to build in the economy. another piece of data, the biggest problems facing our economy, taxes/regulation, 29%. i would say that's a victory given that europe is not in there for fear of recession is not in there. too much deficit reduction, 16%. slow job growth, 12%. too little deficit reduction, 10%. guys, these are more normal problems, i would say, than we've had in the past. the european financial crisis, u.s. financial crisis. sue, i would take a victory, yes, there are problems out there. >> i totally agree with you. it's the first time in a long time we haven't seen europe on a list like that. >> thank you, steve. >> absolutely. thanks, steve. >> sure. >> the markets h
safe financial move it could hurt young adults and economy as a whole. brenda buttner, anchor of "bulls and bears." i guess it's a story here is that young people are avoiding debt and not getting sort of themselves mixed up in some of these predatory practices that young people have been the target in the past. so had a part of the story is good, right? >> absolutely. during the great recession everybody stopped using their credit cards but particularly those under 35. especially undergraduates as you brought up. in a sense that is good, whenever you hear from a personal financial expert, get some extra money, pay off your credit card debt, but having no credit and misusing credit are two different things and could have potentially difficult implications for our economy and for these young adults. >> rick: i remember my mother telling me, go and get one credit card, buy something you need but get your books and put it on the card and then pay it off in full. that is the way to start establishing a good credit? >> who is your mom. eileen -- that is good advice to your son. that is exact
this. gallup, fox news, rasmussen, after the economy, the number two concern to the people is the debt. i think there is a growing sense that government spending and government debt at these levels, it does act as a huge drag on the economy. connell: what we have been saying here, unless the interest rates start to go up, you can pull people and they can say whatever they want. their behavior will not change unless you see a spike in interest rates. >> it will be hard to get a spike in interest rates with the fed flooding the system with liquidity. the whole world is on painkillers right now. we have become addicted to liquidity, easy solutions and until the fed start to bring it in and interest rates go up, i do not see a change. dagen: do the people who are still buying taxable debt, you start to see money flowing back into u.s. stock. you see billions every week into world stock. >> i think we are somewhere close to the end of a bond bubble. for the third time in 60 years, we are looking at ten year treasury rates below inflation. that is, obviously, not a way to build over time. we
. the economist is out with a report on our economy's saying that our economy is in better shape than you think. we're back with that in a moment. first, i want to give a shout out to my grandmother mabel. she convinced her nursing home to switch cable providers just to see the cycle every day. go, mabel! [ jackie ] it's just so frustrating... ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaucoma, or can not empty your bladder, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical help right away if your face, lips, throat or tongue swells. toviaz can cause blurred vision, dizziness, drowsiness and decreased sweating. do not drive, operate machinery or do unsafe tasks until you know how tovia
idea. i mean, if you look at cyprus' economy, there are two major factors to that economy. tourism and financial services. you could kill the financial services immediately right there. so it's two underpinnings. almost like when greece was doing smo of the same things. >> but you say it matters because it could spread elsewhere? >> just the thought that somebody thought this was a good idea is scary enough to me, i would think. but it's going to be one of those things. we'll have to watch and see how it folds out. but i've got a feeling it will have to turn itself around fairly quickly. >> michael, what do you think? have you changed any of your behavior in terms of allocating capital, as a result of what we've seen in the last 48 hours? >> no, not really, maria. i still think that cyprus is certainly something to watch. but i think it's just part of the negotiation process, exactly what's happening in greece. we have to watch and see if it accelerates and this idea sweeps around europe, but i doubt that's going to happen. i actually think that europe is starting to present some o
by foreign media organizations. i think there are two main concerns. first, whether the chinese economy will continue to grow sustainably. and secondly, whether a stronger china will become more assertive, and even -- [inaudible] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: i think these two concerns are really necessary. china is capable of achieving sustainable and a healthy economic development, in pursuing social progress. and that are more than 1.3 billion people in this country so we are on a long journey towards modernization. for that we would require an international environment of lasting peace. even if china becomes stronger, we will not seek edge me. because we have learned from our own experience in the modern period that one should not impose on others what he himself does not desire. this is an article of faith for us. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: let me underscore here that china has an unwavering commitment to peaceful development. we also have an unshakable determination to safeguard our country's sovereignty and terri
economy. that is the real engine of the economic prosperity. >>> plus the supreme court this week will hear two important cases concerning same sex marriage. shouldn't the black robe masters leave the important social decisions to the states and their democratically elected legislatures or referenda? let the people decide. "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, in recent weeks, he's become a conservative super hero icon. that following his triumphant speeches at the national prayer service and the cpac political conference. dr. ben carson has a message to roll back obama care, deal with the crushing national debt, and even a bib llically based call r a flat tax. that's what i love. is he the conservative that can save the gop? here is the aforementioned dr. ben carson. director of the pediatric division at john hopkins university. and with us this hour, cnbc contributors keith boykin. as always, dr. carson, great to see you. i'm reading one of many articles that you're retiring in 100 days. i wonder if you would share future plans, especially public service. >> i have
economy, child-care benefits, and reforms to the national health service. this is just over 30 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. eagues and others and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have server, furt >> the prime minister. >> this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and, in addition to my duties in this house, i shall have further such meetings later today. >> we all know that the prime minister believes there is no alternative to his double-dip, his double-debt, or his loss of the triple-a credit rating, but is he aware that his back benchers and some of his cabinet believe there is an alternative to him? hear, hear. >> what this government are delivering are 1 million private-sector jobs and the fastest rate of new business noires history. we have paid down the deficit by 25% and have cut immigration by a third. we have a long, hard road to travel, but we are going in the right direction. >> hear, hear. >> mr. james morris. >> i am sure that the prime minister will wish to add his condolences to the family and friends of c
, it impacts our economy in a very significantly negative way. all we have to do is look across the atlantic at europe and what's happening there to get a glimpse of the crisis that can come from not dealing with ever-increasing debt and not taking steps necessary over a period of time to put your country on a fiscal path to health. now, i think most of us know here that we have to make some tough choices and it's going to require political will in order for us to address this. we've been avoiding this for years. expoo we're going to face a debt-induced catastrophe if we don't address it and drean addrt soon. so when you're faced with this kind of fiscal mess, what do you do? well, what families and pise businesses all across america have had to do when they face these types of situations is sit down, create a budget, put themselves back on a path to balance and to prosperity on and to avoid the inevitable, a collapse of the family budget or the business budget. our communities and states have had to do this, and we see this happening everywhere except in washington. it is this body and this
country at the forefront of the global economy. israelis understand the value of education and have produced 10 nobel laureates. [applause] understand the power of invention and universities educate engineers. that spirit has led to economic growth and progress. ,olar power, electric cars synthetic limbs, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they , home ofok at tel aviv research centers and startups. [applause] are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. twoy the trade between our countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is
when the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> i like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mitch saying my goodness the husqvarna all-wheel-drive mower is here. engineered with a unique drive system and dual transmission. all-wheel traction. all-wheel power. all done. only from husqvarna. challenge the impossible. all your imptant legal matters in just minutes. protect youramily... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. got you ! you cannot escape the rebel forces ! ahhh. got you ! got ya ! gotcha ! got ya. that's all you got, brother ? take that. never having to surrender the things thamatter. gotcha. that's powerful. verizon. [inaudible] >> keep up the good work. >> thank you. neil: if jimmy fallon does get "the tonight show" and it does come to new york, the joke ultimately could be on businesses already in new york. because andrew cuomo's new budget would give this show a huge tax break
is not buying it. and some economists are now saying that there's a shadow economy that could explain why the retail sales are rising despite static credit spending and paychecks. an explanation at last. at it all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. >>> from fox, at 3:00 in new york city, seven u.s. marines are dead and several others hurt after a training exercise in nevada. it happened at hawthorne army depot there last night. the military uses that base to store weapons and train troops. according to military sources, large mortar, like the one you see hour, somehow exploded. officials describe frantic scene. it was 45-minute chopper flight to the nearest trauma center in reno. today the white house says the president is watching the developments. >> the president's thoughts and prayers go to the families of those who were lost and those who are injured. we're obviously in the early stages of assessing the incident. it's a tragedy, clearly, and the president was briefed immediately on -- and made aware of it immediately and briefed on it, and we're monitoring the situation.
on the economy, the market, and the fed next. ♪ i'm lorenzo. i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work for one. that company, the united states postal service®, works for thousands of home businesses. because at usps.com®, you can pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. i can even drop off free boxes. i wear a lot of hats. well, technically i wear one. the u.s. postal service®, no business too small. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. yes, it is. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. ans
really suffered greatly throughout this week, as we noted. the economy in cyprus, is going to continue to drop. 10 to 20% is likely. this is a country that was glowerrishing before -- fluorishing before it joined eurozone, but now cyprus is taking a hair cut for greece, and greece for cyprus, and the troika is coming in to help. you cannot just jump out at this time. yet there is no room for nail failure, they are not printing more money, they will severe draconian measured. severe austerity, one country at a time, in the meantime people are weeping, imagine everything you have known to be true, is not true any more. neil: if you think about it, ty. you are a big investor, and world renounce, a lot of folks in europe, their bank acount is everything, their savings are there their vestments are in glorifies pass book savings accounts, that is it. so a trust has been broken to say nothing of the trust in european club, to keep it going. i think when you let people down, when you scare them, when you break a trust of confidence it is really katie bar the door, isn't it? >> i don't think t
this going as well as it is because it's really a commitment to the economy of the whole region as to this particular project. having said that, the super bowl bid is an incredible thing and the strength of our bid is a collaboration of this whole region. this is how we think we will win this bid. this is not for any one particular city, it's us working together. not only on transportation issues, not only on cites, but all the hospitality that we have set. i want to thank all the regionals for working together. we want that super bowl xv very badly. we think we have the greatest opportunity to work for it and not only to win that bid, but to get ourselves in an incredible rotation for other super bowl hosting. we look at this long-term and it's the reasonable approach that will give us the strengths for the nfl to take into consideration. i want to be thankful for all the regions mayor's for joining us and the 49er organization. they brought us together at this time. it's going to be a great thing for san francisco. thank you. >> thank you for coming out. this is an amazing sit
the depth and length of this weak economy. in some ways the strongest argument for obama to replace him is a partisan argument. there have been republicans in this job now for more than 20 years. and i think democrats may not want the fed chairman job to be something that is seen as a republican job. now, bernanke is, of course, being criticized much more by republicans than democrats will at this point but he still is originally a republican, there are some, geithner, and summers, and including in blinder who would be serious candidates if persh key were to leave. >> rose: your thought, sir? the scuttlebutt from everybody is that he'll probably have snuff after eight years. i do believe that if he wants a third term and he asked the president for it, he'd probably get it for the reasons david said. he's done a very good-- never mind personal, never mind republican. he's just done a very good job. as david said, he's got republicans a lot angrier than teams, even though he came into this job as a bush appointee from the republican side. so i think if bernanke is an eight-year chairman,
. connell: highest level close to five years. the economy may be improving. the problem for president obama is his approval rating is not. 47% of americans approving. doug shaw is here to answer that. a record-breaking run last week. you have home production neared the unemployment rate falling. >> first of all, we have dysfunction in washington. we do not have a budget deal. economic growth was tested in the fourth quarter. there is no sign that it is reviving. there really is no revival on main street. connell: is there something politically bad be done? is there something they are not doing right? shouldn't they be better able to take advantage of the perfect stock market and little bit better economic numbers? i think the president is trying to do that now, connell. reaching out to the public senators and paul ryan. we made a deal on the but with newt gingrich. the same thing needs to be done now. dagen: something really struck me. i do not mean to harp on it. the average american wakes up in the morning, you tell me how he feels or she feels that deficit with the daily impact. you kind
, it has taken us 40 years to build our economy to the level it is. with done one day -- within one day, we have shot it down. we are very betrayed. >> they can do it anywhere. live in europe, europe has betrayed us. >> at one stage, the crowd was urged to march towards the presidential palace. many people believed their savings had been guaranteed. what is clear is that the bailout deal negotiated in brussels cannot be implemented here except in the face of furious opposition. will have depositors to pay -- just reducing the amounts savers and depositors will have to pay probably won't be enough. teeple are still trying to get their money out of cash machines, but there are limits on how much they can withdraw. a parliamentary vote on the bailout has been postponed yet again. the government feared it might not win a majority for the bailout. without extra funding, cyprus faces bankruptcy. the british community around -- the british community, around 60,000, is also assessing its losses. cypriot friends are in shock. >> they felt as though someone had put their hand in their pocket and take
food assistance to kids in this country and funding for r&d will drive our economy, but we can't appropriate a sum of money to fix the real cost of iraq. can't pay back the lives of 4,486 american men and women who have died there or the roughly 2,000 broken soldiers who came home and took their own lives. the wounded, physically and mentally, the soldiers who didn't know how not to be a soldier, the families living with a hole in their hearts and the families living with someone they no longer recognize. 10 years leaving their families, living in hell, coming home to unemployment and the homelessness, to a country that's forgotten that it's at war at all, to a country that seems to think a yellow ribbon magnet on their bumper is the only kind of support that oir troops need and the cost in iraq, untold deaths. let me rephrase that. unknown deaths. we can only guess at the destruction that we have left in our wake. 115,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in
and the new fed forecast for the economy. and the stocks we're focused on this morning, blackberry getting an upgrade at morgan stanley and a note titled why it won't go down and it gets into the best buy bull camp, and calling it the best near-term idea in the sector. let's get straight to fedex. the package delivery company says it earned $1.23 a share in the fiscal third quarter and below wall street forecasts. fedex says the customers were choosing slower transit services. this does happen, of course, after a massive run in the transports. >> one of the things that amazes me about fedex is they keep missing and they get loved a few days later. missed and gets loved. it's still regarded as being a profit machine. they have this restructuring that people like very much. people feel it's only a matter of time before someone steps up to the more expensive freight. to me, my charitable trust owns ups. ups has the expectations lower. scott davis always says negative things. >> melissa hit the nail on the head. the stock had a big run and the two guys were going head to head over what was in
against iran have been effective. he said this was due to the iranian economy is over dependence on oil. he said he was not opposed to direct talks to america about iran's nuclear program. >>> the european union has given cyprus until monday to raise 6 billion euros or risk losing a bailout fund. after public outrage on the island, the government backed away from the planned, asking all bank depositors to pay a one-off tax. now have to come up with the money some other way. gavin hewitt has the latest. >> there is anger and anxiety in cyprus. this was a crowd of bank workers blocking access, and arriving mps had to be lifted over police barricades. protesters fear their bank will collapse. were shaken. why did they shout at you? >> because they're losing money. linesing the day, long had formed at the cash machines as the government's scramble to raise billions of euros to avoid bankruptcy. the lines mainly focused on one bank, rumored to be in difficulty. >> there is a rumor that if somebody does not buy it, it will close. >> at 1 cash machine, they posted the time when there would be
earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
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